Individual Treatment and Home Practice

  Speech therapists, (also known as speech pathologists) strive to provide the most effective treatment

 

Speech therapists, (also known as speech pathologists) strive to provide the most effective treatment for individuals with speech and communication disorders. To learn more about the benefits of speech therapy, Murphy, Texas families can visit Speech And OT. For several years, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has been gathering data through the National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS). Through NOMS, speech language pathologists collect data to assist in determining what factors may best affect progress in treatment.
NOMS uses Functional Communication Measures (FCMs) scales. These are disorder specific ratings from least functional (Level 1) to most functional (level 7). With articulation, level 1 would indicate that speech cannot be understood even by familiar listeners. A child may initially be at this level or a higher level. Progress is measured through several levels, with level 7 indicating a child’s connected speech being more like what is expected for chronological peers.
Pre-Kindergarten NOMS data confirms some important findings for pediatric speech therapy. When measuring articulation progress, children receiving individual therapy made significantly more progress than children served in a group setting. Additionally, more hours of treatment equate with a greater rate of progress.
Articulation Therapy
Progress with 10.1 – 20 hours of treatment: Individual – 80%, Group 42%
Progress with 20.1 – 40 hours of treatment: Individual – 91%, Group – 50%
Another important finding in regards to progress with articulation, is that completion of a structured home program, partnered with at least 10 hours of individual treatment yielded the greatest progress for children.
Progress through multiple levels with 10+ hours of therapy and no home program: 45%
Progress through multiple levels with 10+ hours of therapy and a consistent home program: 83%
The NOMS data supports the critical importance of family involvement to insure the most effective progress in articulation therapy. It is important to use the services of a speech pathologist who demonstrates strategies and provides training for home practice. The speech pathologist should provide visuals to assist in home programs insuring that the family has a clear understanding of the sounds and positions the child needs for current practice. It is also clear from the data that individual treatment is much more effective for articulation disorders. Individual therapy is often a covered service with many private insurance plans as well as with Medicaid.
To learn more about articulation disorders or other communication disorders, visit .